How to Remove Echo from Audio

This emindsca will show you how to remove echo or reverb from an audio file. Most digital audio workstations include built-in effects for removing, or at least reducing, echo or reverb from an audio file.

Method 1 Using Adobe Audition

1. Launch Adobe Audition. It has a green square icon with the word “Au” in the centre. To open Adobe Audition, click the icon. You can use Adobe Audition’s effect to easily remove or reduce echo and reverb from an audio file. To download and use Adobe Audition, you must first purchase a subscription.

Older versions of Adobe Audition do not support the DeReverb effect. There are, however, third-party Dereverb effect plug-ins available for purchase that work with nearly all digital audio workstations. Some offer a free trial period.

2. Open the audio file from which you want to remove the echo. Adobe Audition supports a wide range of audio formats, including mp3, wav, aiff, flac, ogg, and ffmpeg, among others. To open an audio file in Adobe Audition, follow these steps:

Click File in the menu bar at the top.

Click Open.

Select the file you want to edit.

Click Open.

3. Choose the entire wave file. Simply double-click the audio file to select it in its entirety. You can also select a section of the audio file by clicking and dragging.

4. Select the DeReverb effect. Use the following steps to select the DeReverb effect.

Click Effects in the menu at the top.

Click Noise Reduction/Restoration.

Click DeReverb.

5. To listen to the audio, press the play button. It’s in the DeReverb effect window’s lower-left corner. This allows you to hear how the audio sounds after DeReverb has been applied.

To turn off the effect, click the power icon (the circle with a line through the top) in the lower-left corner. This allows you to hear how the audio sounds before and after applying DeReverb.

6. The slider bar next to “Amount” can be dragged. Click and drag the slider bar next to “Amount” at the bottom of the DeReverb effect window to increase or decrease the amount of DeReverb you want to add. Using too much DeReverb will reduce audio quality. Applying too little will result in some residual echo or reverb. To hear how the audio sounds with the current amount of DeReverb, click the Play icon in the lower-left corner.

7. Click the Apply button. When you’re happy with how the audio sounds, click Apply in the effect window’s lower-right corner.

8. Open the Amplitude Statistics window. Use the following steps to open the Applitute Statistics window:

Click Window in the menu bar at the top.

Click Amplitude Statistics.

Click Scan Selection in the lower-left corner.

9. Note the Average RMS Amplitude. It’s under the “General” tab in the Amplitude Statistics window.

10. Activate the Dynamics effect. Dynamics includes a noise gate that you can use to limit the amount of sound that occurs between spoken words. To add Dynamics, follow the steps below.

Dynamics is not available in older versions of Adobe Audition, but you can download third-party noise gate effects that work with almost all digital audio workstations.

11. Check “AutoGate”. It’s on the left side of the Dynamics effect window.

12. Set the Threshold to be the same as the Average RMS Amplitude. In the Amplitude Statistics window, click the number below the Threshold knob below AutoGate and type the number you noted as your Average RMS Amplitude. If necessary, round the number up.

13. To listen to the audio, press the play button. It’s in the Dynamics effect window’s lower-left corner. This allows you to hear how the audio sounds with Dynamics turned on.

14. As needed, increase the Hold time. If the AutoGate is cutting off parts of your spoken words, click and drag the “Hold” know to lengthen the hold time. To hear how the audio sounds, press the play button. Repeat until the AutoGate eliminates excess noise between words but not any of the spoken words themselves.

You should also reduce the release time to 50 ms.

15. Click the Apply button. When you’re happy with how the audio sounds, click the Apply button in the lower-left corner of the effect window to apply Dynamics with the AutoGate.

16. The audio file should be exported. If you’re happy with how the audio sounds, you can save it in AIFF, MP3, Quicktime, or Wav format. To export your audio file, follow the steps below.

Click File.

Click Save As.

Enter a name for the file next to “Filename.” You may want to use a different file name from the original.

Select the desired format using the drop-down menu next to “Format.”

Click Save.

Method 2 Using Audacity

1. Launch Audacity. Audacity’s icon is an audio wave sandwiched between two blue headphones. To launch Audacity, click the icon.

To get Audacity, go to https://www.audacityteam.org/download/ and select the appropriate download link for your computer’s operating system. After downloading, double-click the installer file and follow the on-screen instructions.

2. Launch the audio file. Audacity supports the majority of audio formats, including mp3, wav, aiff, flac, ogg, and ffmpeg. To play an audio file, do the following:

Click File

Click ‘Open

Browse to and select the audio file.

3. Choose the entire audio file. Simply double-click the wave to select the entire audio file once you’ve opened it in Audacity. You can also select a section of the audio by clicking and dragging.

4. Use a Compressor (if needed). If there is a significant difference between the loud and quiet parts of your audio file, you can use the Compressor effect to reduce the disparity between the loud and quiet parts of your audio file. Apply a compressor as needed throughout the audio editing process by following the steps below:

Select Effects.

Click Compressor.

Drag the slider bar next to “Ratio” until the line in the graph at the top is slightly lower than its default position. You can also lower the threshold and reduce the noise on the floor.

To hear how it sounds, click the Preview button. When you’re happy with the sound, click OK to apply the effect.

5. Obtain a noise profile. A noise profile is an audio sample that is used to reduce excess noise with the Noise Reduction effect. To obtain a noise profile, perform the following steps:

Highlight a section of the audio that contains an example of the noise you want to reduce by clicking and dragging. You can, for example, emphasise the excess sound that can be heard after a word is spoken.

Click Effects in the menu bar at the top.

Click Noise Reduction.

Click Get Noise Profile.

Close out of the window.

6. Use Noise Reduction. Noise Reduction employs the noise profile you just captured to reduce background noise in the audio file. If, after applying Noise Reduction, there are still sections of your audio where an echo can be heard, you can use another Noise Profile and apply more Noise Reduction. To use Noise Reduction, follow these steps:

Double-click to highlight the entire audio wave.

Click Effects in the menu bar at the top.

Click Noise Reduction.

Click Preview to hear how highlighted audio sounds with Noise Reduction.

Drag the slider next to “Noise reduction (dB)” to increase or decrease the effect.

Drag the slider next to “Sensitivity” to increase or decrease the volume at which the effect is applied.

Click Preview to hear the audio again.

Click Ok when satisfied with how the audio sounds.

7. Use Amplify (if needed). Because Noise Reduction makes the audio quieter, you can use the Amplify effect to increase the volume. If you use too much amplification, the audio will sound distorted. After using Amplify, you may need to add another Compressor effect. To use Amplify, follow the steps below:

Double-click to select the entire audio file.

Click Effects in the menu bar at the top.

Click Amplify.

Drag the slider below “Amplification (dB)” to the right.

Check Allow Clipping.

Click Preview to hear the audio with the effect.

Click Ok if you are satisfied with how the audio sounds.

8. Make use of a Low Pass or High Pass Filter (if needed). You may need to use a low or high pass filter depending on how your audio sounds. Apply a low pass filter if the audio is high pitched and has a lot of hisses. Apply a high pass filter if it sounds low and muffled.

Click Effects menu.

Click Low-Pass Filter or High-Pass Filter, depending on which effect is needed.

Use the pull-down menu to select the Rolloff (dB per octave) range. Your options are between 6 dB to 48 dB.

Click Preview to hear the audio sounds

Click “Ok” to apply the effect when you are satisfied with how it sounds.

9. Use Graphic Equalizer (if needed). Graphic EQ (also known as Equalizer) is a tool used to shape the overall tone of an audio file. To change the tone frequencies of the audio file, use the slider bars in the effect window. Drag them above the centre line to increase frequency, and drag them below the line to decrease frequency. The low, bass frequencies are affected by the slider bars on the left. The high-pitched, treble frequencies are affected by the slider bars on the right. The slider bars in the centre affect the mid-tones between the bass and treble. To use Graphic EQ, follow these steps:

Click Effects.

Click Graphic EQ.

Use the slider bars at the bottom to adjust the frequencies in the audio file.

Click Preview to hear the audio with the EQ.

Click Ok to apply the effect when you are satisfied with how the preview sounds.

10. The audio file should be exported. When you’re happy with the sound of the audio file, you can export it so that it can be played in your media player. To export the audio file, follow these steps:

Click File in the menu bar at the top.

Select Export

Click Export as MP3.

Click Save.

11. Conserve the project. You should save the project if you intend to edit the audio file further in the future. To save the project, follow these steps:

Click File. in the menu bar at the top.

Click Save Project

Click Ok in the popup menu.

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